Simple Steps Towards Better Living

mung-bean-sprouts

We live in a fast-paced world, juggling careers, family obligations, house and yard work. In spite of modern technology and convenience foods, we seem to have less time to enjoy the simple pleasures of life. We live in a world of chemical preservatives and “chicken nuggets” that bear little resemblance to traditional, wholesome food. Is it any wonder we’re stressed out and unhealthy? Shouldn’t we give some thought towards real nourishment and simplicity?

No matter where you live – whether on a one acre homestead or a small apartment on the 10th floor- and even on a small income, you can give yourself a better life by eating home grown food and creating your own herbal medicines.

Many people think you need a big garden to produce fresh vegetables and herbs, when in fact most vegetables and herbs can be grown on a deck, patio or kitchen counter. Also consider… sprouts!

Easy to grow on the counter, all you need is a jar with a lid, a screen for straining, and organic seeds for sprouting. Here is a link with detailed instructions on growing sprouts:

https://sproutpeople.org/growing-sprouts/

For those who like the taste of garlic, but find whole cloves too overwhelming for small meals, consider growing garlic cloves just for the green shoots. Obtain garlic cloves from your local garden center or supermarket. Fill a few small pots with high quality potting soil, moisten the soil, and divide the cloves into several sections. Insert the cloves about an inch down into the soil, and place the pots on a sunny window sill or on the patio or deck. They’ll sprout in about 2 weeks, and you can use these delicious greens for cooking. The greens have a milder garlic flavor and you’ll get several “mini-crops” from each pot. Two nutrient packed foods right there at your fingertips!

You can also grow your own herbal medicines! It’s easier than it might sound – and it represents a big step toward greater self-reliance. Medicinal herbs such as garlic, yarrow, Echinacea, peppermint, chamomile and calendula are not difficult to grow. You can make them into simple medicinal preparations such as tinctures, and healthy and therapeutic teas. Visit the archives here for information about making your own herbal medicines and stocking the home pharmacy.

You may want to consider replacing commercial and chemical-laden soaps, deodorants and shampoos with all natural personal care products. Much better for you and the environment. Do some research about those hazardous ingredients in lotions and perfumes. Do the same for hair and other sprays.

Whether you make your own clothes or buy them, learn the basics of how to sew on a button, baste a hem, or remove stains. Clothes will last longer if you turn them inside out before laundering. Less fading and wear and tear on seams.

Check out Home Depot online videos on how to do home repairs. Or do as the Amish do: they barter their skills among their communities. Chopping wood and sewing in exchange for help with the goat pens or chicken coops, for example. Communities that work together with common goals in mind have longer lasting friendships and tend to be there for each other during difficult times.

Try having meatless meals 3 times a week. Ask for paper instead of plastic at the store. Buy second hand or check out thrift stores — sometimes the same or better quality than something new! Keep your car as long as you can — one less payment you’ll have to make.

If you don’t need it, don’t buy it. If no one can use it or wear it, trade it or give it away. And above all… slow down. The dust will still be there after you return from a sunset walk or playtime with the kids. It’s about slowing down and enjoying life with less. Less tension and stress and a simpler life style. Less dependence on “big brother” and more self-sufficiency on your part.

Blessed be, sweet ones

~ Meadow Walker

 

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1 Comment on Simple Steps Towards Better Living

  1. Reblogged this on ravenhawks' magazine and commented:
    Good information, thank you

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